This lodge, situated in a clearing, provides a fine view of Camel’s Hump. This fine and comfortable cabin, built of stone and stucco to discourage porcupines, was erected in 1928 by the Burlington Section of the GMC. It has a good stove and bunks for 12 or more hikers. [G8 8th Edition 1930] It was abandoned after trail relocation because of Bolton Valley Ski Area.
This cabin was recently erected. It is a closed frame construction suitable for 12 and is the gift of the Blue Triangle Club of the State YMCA. Located in the woods on the bank of the crook.
A lumbering camp about 0.5 mile from Bread Loaf Inn in Middlebury Gap For several years we have hoped to have some lodges which the Bread Loaf School could consider its own, for its own use, rather than for the public. At length we have such a one, and it is ready for occupancy. It is Blowdown Camp, on the brook two miles northeast of the Inn. It is not a lodge of the Adirondack type, but is a chopper’s camp, generously turned over to the School for its use by Mr. Fritz, the College Forester. It has been cleaned out and renovated. The camp is reached by the Gilmore Trail, which is in excellent condition, and is clearly marked all the way with the blue blaze, which is the blaze of the Forestry Dept. and the Bread Loaf School. The camp[s] is available for picnic groups from the School, or small parties over-night. The bunks are ready with fresh balsam on them, so that no preparation in that line is needed, but over-night parties need to take their blankets. There are no cooking utensils except a good tea-kettle and a four-quart pail. The sleeping capacity will accommodate parties up to six. It is quite feasible to take both supper and breakfast there, or to set back to the Inn for breakfast. The windows have screens on, and those who use the cabin are asked to leave the window open as they are and to shut the door when they come away, so as to keep flies and mosquitos out. In order to avoid “stacking up,” Mrs. Harrin:ton has been asked to act as the one to whom word can be given. She will reserve the cabin for parties who plan to use it on a given date.
It is expected that the new cabin at Birch Glen will be ready about the Fourth of July. It will be a log structure of ample proportions. A slab lining will tend to make the cabin considerably warmer and more weatherproof than the average shelter. It will also embody several unique features that will provide more adequate ventilation and lighting of the bunks. The cabin, which will afford comfortable sleeping accommodations for from sixteen to twenty, will be equipped with stove and cooking utensils. It will be close to an adequate water supply and within easy walking distance of Hanksville, with its shopping and mail facilities. This log structure, built in 1930 by GMC volunteers, has an open front “living room” and semi-enclosed sleeping quarters with bunk space for 12. The water source is a brook 100 ft. south. The shelter is located only 100 ft. down the Beane Trail which leads 1.5 miles west to Carse Road. Used from 1930 to present.
In 1913, Miss Emily Proctor provided a fund through which three log lean-tos were erected. The shelter construction of the existing LT was started at this time. The approach trail to Birch Glen begins at the farm buildings and crosses a pasture where the way is marked by cairns. Entering woods and passing through a fence the trail becomes a well-marked woodland path. At the end of a mile from the Beane Place it arrives at this lodge on the LT, one of the shelters maintained by the GMC. The lodge is in an open forest of beech and yellow birch with occasional towering spruces.
A log lean-to with floor space for 6. It was built by the Worcester Section and named in honor of Louis L Bigelow, for many years an active trail worker in the Worcester Section. Water is from Bigelow Spring, 150 ft. east of the shelter on the trail. He was instrumental in laying out and completing the trails over Glastenbm·y Mountain, and headed up the building of the camps and shelters in the Stratton region. Later, he helped the completion of the Long Trail system by the trail from Jay Peak to the Canadian border. This shelter is located on the Lye Brook Trail on the south shore of Stratton Pond just 0.1 mile west of the LT. This shelter is in one of the heaviest usage areas of the LT system and is managed by a caretaker located at the Willis Ross clearing. Used from 1961 to 1997. It was dismantled in 1997. It was built to replace the Willis Ross Annex which was flooded due to beaver activity at the outlet which raised the water level about 1 foot. It was started in August 1961, and finished the first part of October 1961. This shelter is located on the Lye Brook Trail on the south shore of Stratton Pond just 0.1 mile west of the LT. This shelter is in one of the heaviest usage areas of the LT system and is managed by a caretaker located at the Willis Ross clearing. Used from 1961 to 1997. It was dismantled in 1997. It was built to replace the Willis Ross Annex which was flooded due to beaver activity at the outlet which raised the water level about 1 foot. It was started in August 1961, and finished the first part of October 1961.
The USFS, under the direction of Sidney B. Davis, has constructed this shelter at a site 600 feet downstream from the new suspension bridge. It is on the proposed trail relocation scheduled for completion in the spring of 1964. Continuing alongside Big Branch, the Trail follows an old road, passes the stone foundation of a mill, and reaches Big Branch Shelter. This frame lean-to, with floor space for was built by the USFS in 1963. Big Branch furnishes water. The outhouse is-up the hill behind the shelter. It has been in use from 1963 to present.
Has good water and views. A side trail leads down the southern slope to an interesting asbestos mine.
Described as a "roofless cabin" on Herber Congdon's original 1918 map, this cabin was located on the Long Trail between Molly Stark and Baby Stark Mountains. It's unclear if this cabin was ever used as shelter. It may have served solely as a rest stop due to the nearby spring.
Soon after its founding in January 1946, the Sterling Section announced plans to build a replacement for the bedraggled Mould Lodge, (Shattuck Lodge). Work began that May. Fifteen volunteers, including Fred Mould, who built the previous shelter, turned up every warm weekend to build a sturdy log cabin in the Beaver Meadow. A horse was used to skid logs to the site and some of the lumber came from nearby Mould Lodge which was dismantled. The new lodge was completed the following year.
Perched on a rocky knoll above the trail, this shelter was built by Bob Lindemann and the Sterling Section in 1991. The formal dedication occurred just after the first snowfall on Mansfield and Whiteface Mountains.
In July 1967, work parties from the Tamarack Farm and Wilderness Camp in Plymouth Union Vermont began work building a new shelter, on the site of the previous Battell Shelter.  Part of a work service project in cooperation with the Green Mountain National Forest, supplies provided by the US Forest Service were airlifted in, where camp counselors supervised campers in the construction.  Section volunteers would return to complete this typical wood-frame shelter.