Lumber waiting for shipment in Aldrichville (Aldrich Job), an old lumbering town, now an abandoned ghost town
Lumber waiting for shipment in Aldrichville (Aldrich Job), an old lumbering town, now an abandoned ghost town

A once thriving turn-of-the-century mill village in the town of Wallingford, this ghost town lies near the present Long Trail crossing of Homer Stone Brook. Observant hikers will notice stone walls and the odd brick. This site was the subject of archeological dig in 2007.

Local businessman and logger Barney Aldrich established Aldrichville and operated it as a mill village in the late nineteenth century.

The town featured a steam-powered mill (switched over from waterpower, probably in the 1890s). At its peak, the village had a store, school, blacksmith shop, boarding house, and roughly a dozen households. The houses were divided into two neighborhoods, one French, the other English speaking, on either side of the stream.  Town records, photographs, diaries, and the archaeological record, testify to the presence of children.  There is even evidence of a local baseball team.

For more than twenty years (roughly 1880s-1910s), the mill operated successfully, before being abandoned in favor of a new location in the valley, nearer town and railroad. Today the archaeological remains of this community lie within the Green Mountain National Forest.

In the early day of the Long Trail, some buildings still stood. Early guidebooks mention that one remaining abandoned building west of trail and north of the road affords some shelter.  This camp is no longer mentioned as a place for shelter after 1930.

Although the 3rd Edition of the Long Trail Guide Book (1921), mentions plans for an official GMC camp to be built at Aldrich Camp in 1921, it’s most likely this never happened. The only evidence that this camp may have existed comes from the 5th edition of the guidebook where it appears on the map. However, the description of the camp is suspiciously missing. This discrepancy is most likely do to overly enthusiastic map makers. The camp stopped appearing on the maps by the 8th edition.

Although the 3rd Edition of the Long Trail Guide Book (1921), mentions plans for an official GMC camp to be built at Aldrich Camp in 1921, it’s most likely this never happened. The only evidence that this camp may have existed comes from the 5th edition of the guidebook where it appears on the map. However, the description of the camp is suspiciously missing. This discrepancy is most likely do to overly enthusiastic map makers. The camp stopped appearing on the maps by the 8th edition.


Long Trail News, Winter 2007
Long Trail News, Spring 1999
The Long Trail Guide Book, 2nd Edition, 1920
Long Trail Guide Book 3rd Edition
Long Trail Guide Book 5th Edition