Birch Glen Camp, 5.5 miles from Glen Ellen, 1935
Birch Glen Camp, 5.5 miles from Glen Ellen, 1935

It is expected that the new cabin at Birch Glen will be ready about the Fourth of July. It will be a log structure of ample proportions. A slab lining will tend to make the cabin considerably warmer and more weatherproof than the average shelter. It will also embody several unique features that will provide more adequate ventilation and lighting of the bunks. The cabin, which will afford comfortable sleeping accommodations for from sixteen to twenty, will be equipped with stove and cooking utensils. It will be close to an adequate water supply and within easy walking distance of Hanksville, with its shopping and mail facilities. [LT News, Apr. 1929]

This log structure, built in 1930 by GMC volunteers, has an open front “living room” and semi-enclosed sleeping quarters with bunk space for 12. The water source is a brook 100 ft. south. The shelter is located only 100 ft. down the Beane Trail which leads 1.5 miles west to Carse Road. Used from 1930 to present. [GB 24th Edition 1996]

After many years of chronic roof leak, the roof ridge pole was raised 4.5 feet which increased the slope to 4.5 feet in 11 feet of roof. The roof was also reversed to avoid the eaves to ridge pole drainage. [LT News, Nov. 1961] The bunks were lengthened so now it sleeps 12 instead of 4 to 6. The sleepers can be the same length as Don Wallace as they are now 6’6″ long. Don’s foot overhang is now less than a foot [LT News, August 1965]

The renovated Birch Glen Camp, 2017
The renovated Birch Glen Camp, 2017

The oldest shelter on the LT will be renovated in September 1999. In July. Director of Field Programs Dave Hardy, Field Supervisors Greg Western and Seth Coffey, LT Patrol Crew Leader John Bennett, restoration contractor Jan Lewandoske, and restoration architect Mary Jo Llewelyn, visited the site and discussed repair options. What was likely the original metal roofing was tacked to the sides of the log walls, and with not a little trepidation. we removed this crude but effective porky-proofing. The logs underneath are in great shape! The sill logs, however, suffered from forty to seventy years of neglect and were completely rotten, as was the floor. In September the LT Patrol will replace the log sills, flooring, and bunks. The structure’s age will make it a delicate operation. This year’s work combined with the roofing done a few years ago by Tim Tierney should give Birch Glen another 70 years on the LT. [LT News, Fall 1999]