LT Mile 209.3 — Division 10 — Elev. 1200 ft.

Through the kindness of Mr. Phillip French of Johnson, who owns this property, a beautiful site has been selected near a fine spring with a view of Whiteface to the south and Bowen and Laraway Mts. to the north. Mr. French also generously furnished lumber for the camp. [LT News, August 1931]

This frame camp was built in 1931. It was the first camp built by the LT Patrol and was named after the owner of the land. It had bunks for 12 to 14. Water was at the spring 100 ft. east of camp. It was in use from 1931 to 1992 at which time it was destroyed. [GB 24th Edition 1996]

June 3, 1972, work trip to French Camp: Day ideal – sunny and pleasant. Group found French Camp in excellent shape thanks in large measure to Millie and Pat Yadanza of Sparkill, N.Y., who under the GMC Adopt-a-shelter program have had FC as their foster child for the last year or so. Only work here was propping up the slightly tilted outhouse which the Yadanza apparently built. [Bob Hagerman 6/3/72]

Work Outing, Oct. 20, 1973: Teillon and Hagerman met Strobe at Allen S. Hill Stove Shop in Johnson. Here we picked up a 25 Cushion Quilted box stove. … Hill had cleaned up the stove and filled cracks. … The group carried everything to the camp in short order with their first arrival serving to roust out of the sack two sleeping hikers who had spent the night. Accomplished:

  1. The new stove took the place of 2 other stoves; one was a small cast iron stove in serious disrepair which was designed to bum coal and was unsuitable in the first place. The stove rests on concrete blocks which were set on two widths of metal roofing. A layer of sand was placed in the bottom of the stove to protect the bottom and apparently to improve the draft. With appropriate ceremony Teillon laid a fire and Hagerman lighted it to inaugurate the stove. It worked beautifully.
  2. Strobel’s major project was to construct sashes for windows.
  3. A piece of metal was shaped and nailed along the bottom of the door to cover two large porcupine holes and prevent further damage. A few days later 3 Vermont Forests and Parks Dept. employees with Brent Teillon completed most of the batten stripping. The front of the cabin looks good-despite its 42 years. French Camp is now in good condition, outwardly at least. [Bob Hagerman 10/20/73]

Work Trip July 12, 1975: Fred Judd & Lee Haselton applied a coat of roof tar to the roof and installed some new stovepipe. [Bob Hagerman 7/12/75]

French Camp, 1931
French Camp, 1931
French Camp Interior, 1936
French Camp Interior, 1936