The burning of Gorham Lodge, 12/7/2001
The burning of Gorham Lodge, 12/7/2001

In honor of H. W. Gorham, a member of the New York Section from 1923 until his death in August 1949, his friends are making contributions toward a new cabin or shelter on Camel’s Hump (or, if you prefer, Couching Lion) for which Prof. Buchanan has selected a new location. farther down the north slope than the present dilapidated shelters. Bill grew up in the St. Johnsbury region and was particularly fond of this mountain. Such a memorial seems particularly fitting for one whose love for man and earth. and whose appreciation of the comfort and gladness that association with forest and mountain can bring were so great. Contribution for this shelter may be sent to the treasurer of the New York Section: Ronald Busse, Pearl River, New York, made out to the H. W: Gorham Memorial Shelter Fund. [LT News, Feb. 1949]

This lodge has been a source of debate for many years. It is on State property at high elevation on Camel’s Hump. The State will have the final say as to the destiny of the Lodge when they complete the management plan for this area. The lodge is in poor condition and needs repairs. Eight logs were replaced and leveled, a new floor installed, window frames adjusted, a new door hung and application of several coats of creosote applied. A picture in the LTN of those working on the project shows Ben Davis, Chet Buchanan, Dean Tucker, Charlotte Beam, Fuss Belding, Steve Burns, and Cleo Billings hard at work. This project took ten days. [LT News, November 1981]

The views at night at Gorham Lodge are superb in clear weather. I remember a 2 a.m. walk with the moon and stars lighting my way. The few lights in the valley in homes and on the highway were just impressive. The mountains to the north were silhouetted, giving me a mystic feeling of grandeur. [Paul Woodward]

In honor of H. W. Gorham, a member of the New York Section from 1923 until his death in August 1949, his friends are making contributions toward a new cabin or shelter on Camel’s Hump (or, if you prefer, Couching Lion) for which Prof. Buchanan has selected a new location. farther down the north slope than the present dilapidated shelters. Bill grew up in the St. Johnsbury region and was particularly fond of this mountain. Such a memorial seems particularly fitting for one whose love for man and earth. and whose appreciation of the comfort and gladness that association with forest and mountain can bring were so great. Contribution for this shelter may be sent to the treasurer of the New York Section: Ronald Busse, Pearl River, New York, made out to the H. W: Gorham Memorial Shelter Fund. [LT News, Feb. 1949]

The Lodge is about 112 mile north from the old “Tin Huts; one of which was dismantled to provide roofing material and stands on the edge of a quick drop off, with a magnificent view to the north over the Winooski Valley. Bolton Falls and the main road near it are clearly visible, as is Little River Reservoir. The lodge is only 500 feet west of the old LT and close to excellent water. The structure is built of logs, probably the largest ones that have been used in any camp to date, laid horizontally up to the bottoms of the windows and vertically above which results in more efficient use of timber and saves time. The lodge is about 15 by 20 ft. in size and has a stove brought down from one of the old huts. It is located wonderfully but is the most inaccessible camp for the Patrol to work on. All materials that could not be cut at the site or dragged down from the Huts had to be packed in 2 1/2 mile from Couching Lion Farm. This took time, sweat, and muscle. [LT News, Nov. 1950]

New floor and bunks, Gorham Lodge, 1981
New floor and bunks, Gorham Lodge, 1981

A log cabin with bunks for 12 was built in 1950 by the LT Patrol in memory of H. W. Gorham with funding from the New York Section. The lodge was extensively rebuilt in 1981 by the patrol and GMC volunteers. A brook to the east provides water. In use 1985 to present. [GB 24th Edition 1996]

Funds for the construction were given by Ted Goddard, Jr. in memory of his father. The structure was of log construction 20′ x 16′ with-an open front. Boy Scout Troop 353 of Bennington peeled the logs. Rock footings were built by BSA Troop 355 of Bennington.

It was deemed unsafe, and burned in December. [LT News, Spring 2002]

During the Winter of 2001, Gorham Lodge was badly damaged by heavy snow that pushed the lodge from its foundation.