2.5 miles from Mad Torn Notch

This USFS camping area is mentioned in the 20th Edition of the GB.

During the Depression there were four CCC camps on the Forest —at Danby, Peru, Rochester, and Weston. The CCC used the local men as foremen of work crews which built roads ,maintained the Long Trail, laid out ski trails at Breadloaf and Bromley, and improved timber stands and stream flow. They built the Greendale Recreation Area north of Weston, the White Rocks Picni cArea east of Wallingford, and the picnic areas at Texas Falls and Hapgood Pond.

When the Hapgood Pond was completed in 1936, a Vermont writer, Vrest Orton, related in a newspaper column the CCC improvements done on this small relatively unused weedy site. He described the building of a dam to raise the water level, the sand and gravel brought in, the bath house and pavilion that were built. As a result, he wrote, “the people of Vermont now have a lovely pond and beach surrounded by well-kept green slopes in the midst of a beautiful forest.” Orton then asks in his column a question many were smart enough to ask during and since the CCC years: “what kind of place would this little pond have been had some promoter bought it, sold out concessions and opened the place for profit?” If any one person can be attributed to establishing the Green Mountain National Forest, it should be Gerald S. Wheeler. Gerald S. Wheeler was instrumental in the development of Hapgood Pond. Today the Green Mountain National Forest embraces 630,000 acres, less than half under federal ownership. [David E. Conrad, The Land We Cared For: A History of the Forest Service’s Eastern Region, 1997]

Hapgood Pond Forest Camp, 1937
Hapgood Pond Forest Camp, 1937
Hapgood bathhouse, 1936
Hapgood bathhouse, 1936
Hapgood Pond Forest Camp, 1936
Hapgood Pond Forest Camp, 1936
Hapgood Pond. One of the camp sites on the north portion of the main part of the forest camp much used by day picknickers, 1937
Hapgood Pond. One of the camp sites on the north portion of the main part of the forest camp much used by day picknickers, 1937