Little Rock Pond Shelter, 1935
Little Rock Pond Shelter, 1935

Once the site of a private lumber camp, Little Rock Pond was known and Little Pond until 1924. In 1935 the US Forest Service built a log shelter on a small island in the northwest corner of the pond. This shelter, with bunks for 6 to 8, was reached by footbridge from the mainland. The shelter served hikers for twenty seven years before being replaced by the US Forest Service with another shelter of the same name in 1962.

The shelter’s scenic location proved popular with hikers, which eventually led to its overuse. In a letter to the Long Trail News, Mildrend and Armand Siegel recounted their experience at the shelter. “We are two End-to-Enders who did most of our trip in the years 1943-1945, and for us the few days we spent as “Little Rocky,” as we have come to call it, were about as close as we have ever come in our lives to earhtly paradise. This island gem, set in conditions of intimacy with waters lapping at its foot and the mountains across the pond ever-visible from the shelter, with its shelter that opened out to rocks that sloped down to the pond, made possiblea life lived equally in land, sky and water.”

View of Little Rock Pond Shelter from the trail, 1943
View of Little Rock Pond Shelter from the trail, 1943
Little Rock Pond Shelter bridge in winter, 1935
Little Rock Pond Shelter bridge in winter, 1935
Little Rock Pond, 1936
Little Rock Pond, 1936

Long Trail Guide Book, 11th Edition, 1937

Long Trail Guide Book, 7th Edition 1928

Long Trail News, Feb 1963

Long Trail News Feb 1973