This wood-frame, 3-sided shelter was built on an island in Little Rock Pond in 1962, and replaced a log shelter in the same location, with the same name. A 75-foot-long wood bridge connected the island to the mainland. It was constructed at the same time as the Lula Tye Shelter which sat on the eastern shore of the pond.

Little Rock Pond Island Shelter, 1962
Little Rock Pond Island Shelter, 1962

Its idylic location made it a popular destination. Unfortunately overuse led to the degradation the fragile shoreline. So, in 1972, the decision was made to move it and the Lula Tye shelter away from the shoreline. With the help of the Student Conservation Association, Little Rock Pond shelter was cut into several sections and floated across the pond to the outlet area. It was then carried to its new location, north of the pond and reassembled.

Little Rock Pond Shelter
Little Rock Pond Shelter

In his history of the shelter system, Paul Woodward recounts his memories of staying at the island shelter: “Keith Edson, Joanne Woodward, and I used this shelter on our very first night out on the Long Trail. It was our first backpacking trip ever. We used the oak framed packs given to us by Joanne’s parents, Violet and Whitey Edson. These packs are on display at the GMC museum in Waterbury Center. This trip was in June of 1963 when the Island was covered with trees and much vegetation. The ledge at the shoreline had the name EDSON etched in it. The pond was full of fish. We watched an airplane fly over twice dumping what looked like a big load of white meat into the pond. This was before and after we sat in the shelter watching a dramatic thunder and lightning storm pass through the area. There were wildflowers in bloom on the Island. There was a comfortable collection of boughs already in place when we arrived. At that time. we cooked with a wood fire. The wood was collected on the hill across the bridge, however. Wood fires were probably the primary cause for the relocation of this beautiful shelter as this island was a barren place 10 years later. We were very tired after carrying those heavy uncomfortable packs all day. We slept soundly on the dirt floor without pads that night, as I recall.

Little Rock Pond Shelter, in its second location, 2002
Little Rock Pond Shelter, in its second location, 2002

In 2010, the US Forest Service and the GMC built a new Little Rock Pond Shelter. Both the Lula Tye Shelter and the old Little Rock Pond Shelter were removed the following year.


Woodward, Green Mountain Club Long Trail System Shelter History

Long Trail News, Nov 1977