In 1923 this beautiful lodge was built as the GMC clubhouse. Mortimer R. Proctor and Mrs. Fletcher D. Proctor provided the funds for building and furnishing the new home of the Club, and Paul W. Thayer designed the structure. The clubhouse was so planned as to fit into the rugged surroundings and to utilize not only native material but the cliffs themselves at the site selected. Logs of yellow birch and of white birch, with their shining bark untouched, were used for beams and posts with the building. Lichen-covered and fem-decked rocks became a part of the walls. A great chimney, resting upon a ledge, provided two big stone fireplaces, one for the lounge and the other for the piazza. Bedrooms were outfitted with furniture made of native material. Even the lighting fixtures were fashioned out of sections of birch limbs, by later action the clubhouse was christened LONG TRAIL LODGE. The club adopted the policy of welcoming the public at its new home. Meals are obtainable by any who desire them. Guests introduced by members may have lodging overnight. Since the building is situated close to the motor thoroughfare through Sherburne Pass, it is easily accessible and has a host of visitors. It was destroyed by fire in 1968. [GB 23rd Edition 1985] This Lodge had been sold. [GB 50th Anniversary Edition 1932]

Long Trail,Lodge, 1937
Long Trail,Lodge, 1937

The Green Mountain Club House. The beautiful building shown on the opposite page will be opened to members and the public on May 1, 1924. The bedrooms will be reserved for members and their guests. Guests not accompanied by members should show letters from members. Members should be prepared to show their membership cards or receipts, as they will be entitled to special rates. There are nine bed or bunk rooms, each sleeping two to four people. Meals and It inches will be served to the public as well as members. but why not join the club and help build trails and popularize the Green Mountains. Write to the Club House for special circulars. There is a telephone, baths, and all conveniences. This charming building and its furnishings are a gift to the Club by Mortimer R. Proctor and his mother, Mrs. Fletcher D. Proctor. [GB 5th Edition 1924] Five small cat ins, each with living room, bedrooms, and large fireplace, are of the same novel and attractive design as the main Lodge and may be rented by the day or week. In addition to these, there are seven small cabins without fireplaces or living rooms, which are available for overnight guests at a lower price. One of the very interesting features of the Long Trail Lodge is the identification and marking of the plant life, shrubs, and trees in the vicinity of the Lodge by Mr. Maurice Broun, the Club naturalist, who spends the season at the Lodge and is available to parties who wish to study the botany of the Green Mountains. [GB 10th Edition 1935]

Pamphlet Adervisting The Long Trail Lodge
Pamphlet Adervisting The Long Trail Lodge

A club house at Sherburne Pass is now assured. Several acres of land will be leased from the Vermont Marble Co., and the house will be built next season where the trail crosses the highway. The trees have been cut where it will stand. The cost will be paid by private subscription as far as possible, and any balance will be made up by the general treasury. Mortimer R. Proctor of Proctor, who has been most generous in financial aid to the club, has started the subscription with $200, and another friend has subscribed $100. [The Green Mountain News, Dec. 1922] A gift of $2500. from Mortimer R. Proctor for a club house was announced. His mother, Mrs. Fletcher. D. Proctor would donate the furnishings of the house and supply the water. [The Green Mountain News, April, 1 923] This Clubhouse, which Allen Chamberlain in an illustrated article in the Boston Transcript calls a camp deluxe” and Prof. W. S. Monroe says is “without doubt the most luxurious mountain lodge in the world.” The house was formally opened and dedicated Saturday, Dec. 1, 1923, by a public reception. Over 200 were present during the afternoon and evening and enjoyed dancing to the music of a five-piece orchestra, and a general good time. A buffet lunch was served. [The GM News, Dec. 1923] The principal topic of discussion before the meeting was the management of the new clubhouse, a unique mountain house, fully furnished and equipped, with outbuildings, representing an expenditure to date of some $17,500, with much more remaining to be done before the plant can be considered complete if that time ever comes. Mr. &: Mrs. Charles H. Lester of Rutland have been engaged as managers. This couple have for the past year been in charge of the Knights of Columbus Home in Rutland. The policy as adopted will be to serve meals to all who apply. From May 1 to June 15, meals will be served a la carte. From June 15 until the close of the season, regular meals will be served three time a day at $1 per meal. Lodging for guest, whether accompanied by a member or not, will be $1,50 per night each. The price for members will be $1 per night. [The GM News, April 1924] A bronze tablet which had been placed in the clubhouse commemorating the fact that the house was the gift of Mortimer R. Proctor and the furnishings the gift of his mother, Mrs. Fletcher D. Proctor, has been removed, in deference to the wishes of Mr. Proctor. One complaint has been heard often. Due to the large numbers of patrons, slow service at meals. Three comfortable cabins for the help have been built. A garage accommodating 12 cars, icehouse, woodshed tool house, and an engine house have been built. All is well lighted by electricity. (The GM News, Dec. 1924] Tablet cost $64. The road from the east to the clubhouse will be rebuilt this coming summer, and while it is said a passable way will be kept open during the work, we recommend that during operations the house be approached from the west, via Rutland. [The GM News, April 1925] October 24, 1925, a special meeting of the trustees was held at the clubhouse. The name of the clubhouse was changed to the “Long Trail Lodge is the identification and marking of the plant life, shrubs, and trees in the vicinity of the Lodge by Mr. Maurice Broun, the Club naturalist, who spends the season at the Lodge and is available to parties who wish to study the botany of the Green Mountains. [GB 10th Edition 1935]

The season has opened with a rush, the following large parties having already been entertained: the Young Ladies’ Academy of Rutland for tea; the Proctor University Club for a banquet and business meeting; the Vermont marble salesmen; the Eastern New York Eye, Ear, Nose & Throat Specialists, with the Rutland physicians as guests at a banquet, filling the Lodge to capacity over night; the Engineers of the N. Y. Central lines; the Whist Club of Claremont, N.H. for dinner and overnight; the Arlington Vt., Refrigerator Co’s. salesmen and wives, and other smaller parties. As Mrs. Bates (the manager) truthfully remarks: “The delightful coolness which pervades the Lodge at all times makes it a most attractive place to visit in the warm summer months.” [LT News, Aug. 1929]

Long Trail Lodge dining room, 1954
Long Trail Lodge dining room, 1954
Porch of the Long Trail Lodge
Porch of the Long Trail Lodge

The following extensive alteration and addition to Long Trail Lodge have been decided upon and work has been started on them in accordance with plans drawn by Paul W. Thayer, the original architect of the Lodge: the kitchen enlarged to become dining room, capacity of 100, a porch will seat an added 75, a new wing will contain a serving room, kitchen and cooler, Hillside will be used for a laundry and bake room, the woodshed will be a dormitory for employees. This is needed because many patrons were turned away last season. The Trustees feel that no further additions should be done after completion of these additions. To make it still larger would tend to introduce too much of a commercial atmosphere and the woods charm would be lost. [LT News, Oct. 1929]

Approximately 6800 people had regular meals at the lodge this past season. [LT News, October 1929] A shortage of steeping quarters is being remedied by building 3 plain and comfortable cabins to accommodate two persons each at the cost of $200. each. State Forester Merrill offered to take charge of construction. These will be located in the woods in the direction of Pico near the Lodge. [LT News, June 1932] A discussion about the future of the lodge and the feasibility of leasing at Special Trustees Meeting, Also, winter use. It was decided to open a couple of cabins to persons whose reliability was known. September 10, 1932. [LT News, November 1932]

Trustees Meeting: The principal business transacted was the approval and signing of an agreement with the Treadway Service Co., according to which the latter will take the possession and management of the Long Trail Lodge for the next five years. While there is no guarantee against. losses, which, if any, must be borne by the owner, the agreement, on the whole, seems advantageous to the Club, and to offer better chances of profit that if managed by the Club, as heretofore. The Club reserves the privilege of canceling the lease, under certain circumstances. [LT News, Feb. 1933] The management is sending letters to those known to be interested in hunting next fall, with a view to remaining open until Thanksgiving, if there is sufficient response. [LT News, Sept. 1933] Club advanced for construction of Spruce cabin $500. Gross business was 15% more than in 1936. The Spruce Cabin was a single room with bath and hot and cold water. From the middle of July to Labor Day the Lodge was 90% occupied and on weekends 2 to 4 times its capacity were turned away. [LT News, April 1938] In line with the spirit of promoting winter activity on the Long Trail, the thought which prompted the appointment of a committee on winter sports, the Long Trail Lodge opened on Dec. 10, 1938. The main Lodge will be used for sleeping accommodations for 45 persons. A second-floor bunk room has been developed. Winter rates, European plan, are $.75 to $1.25 per day per person; American plan, $3 to $4 per day. [LT News, June 1932] A discussion about the future of the lodge and the feasibility of leasing at Special Trustees Meeting, Also, winter use. It was decided to open a couple of cabins to persons whose reliability was known. September 10, 1932. [LT News, November 1932]

Long Trail Lodge 2,220 feet - Mount Pico in the distance
Long Trail Lodge 2,220 feet – Mount Pico in the distance , 1930

April 10, 1953, the board of Trustees recommends that the Lodge property be sold. If the Club decides to dispose of the property, any monies received from such a sale should be placed in a fund to be known as the Proctor Memorial Fund, the income from which would be available to the club for carrying out its proper objectives. If the property were sold and the proceeds invested wisely, the Club could get out of debt and the income would provide sufficient funds to take care of Vermont trails and shelters under our supervision and thus give us benefit from the gift — benefit which the donors would surely be pleased for us to have. [LT News, May 1953] On April 24, 1954. an agreement was reached with Grover Wright for the sale of the Lodge. [LT News, May 1954]

Fire of unknown origin destroyed the sleeping cabin near the Lodge known as “Undercliff” early in the morning of July 25, 1930. Loss was covered by insurance. The cabin will be rebuilt. [LT News. August 1930] The new “Undercliff’ cabin. replacing the one destroyed by fire during the summer. is completed. It occupies the same site, and cost $1,300. Another cabin called the Woodfin Camp was also built near the Lodge, the gift of Mrs. Frank D. White of Rutland in memory of her mother. Its cost was $750. Each contains two bedrooms and a living room with stone fireplace and will accommodate 6 & 4 respectively. [LT News, October; 1930] The Lodge was not opened in 1942 or 1943 due to restrictions caused by the war. An offer was accepted by L. G. Treadway to lease the property from the Club for a period of years. Mr. Treadway would assume all expenses and pay a minimal rent for the next 5 years. He did not know when the Lodge would reopen. The management of the Lodge would be independent of the Club but would retain ownership out of respect for the donors and the uniqueness of this attractive woodland resort. [LT News, April. 1944]

Members of the Killington Section were saddened when they awakened on November morning to the news that the well-known Long Trail Lodge had burned down. [LT News, Feb. 1969] Headquarters may move to Mendon. Possibilities for location of new office are 26 State St., Montpelier and the former carriage house building at the Long Trail Lodge in Mendon. [LTN Nov. 1976]