Mile 14.0 — Division 4 — Elev. 1865 ft

For just shy of a year, this 8-person, wood-frame lean-to, built in 1962 on the east shore of Little Rock Pond was known as the “East Shore Shelter.” In 1963 It was renamed the “Lula Tye Shelter” in honor of Lula Tye.

Lula was the GMC’s first paid part-time staff member. She replaced James P. Taylor as Corresponding Secretary in 1926. In the almost 30 years, she served in the main office in Rutland penning letters, managing the books, collecting dues, writing press releases, and organizing the volunteers Lula became the voice of the GMC. At the shelter dedication, at-large member Art Koeber remarked that for him “Lula Tye was the Club.”

Lula M.Tye, GMC Corresponding Secretary from 1925 to 1955
Lula M.Tye, GMC Corresponding Secretary from 1925 to 1955

The shelter’s location soon proved problematic for the delicate shoreline of Little Rock Pond. In 1972, both the Lula Tye and Little Rock Pond shelters were relocated further from the pond. In July, members of the Student Conservation Assocation, under the direction of the US Forest Sevice and the GMC, disassembled, carried, and reassembled the Lula Tye Shelter 0.3 miles south of the pond.

Lula Tye Shelter, 1966
Lula Tye Shelter, 1966

As the trails around Little Rock Pond gained in popularity, having two shelters near the pond proved “clunky”. Plans to replace the old shelters with a new shelter and campground, were developed. After an archealogical excavation yielded information on Abenaki ancestors, a site was chosen for a new Little Rock Pond Shelter. Construction was completed in 2010. The following year the Lula Tye Shelter was removed and the site restored by Yale students on an orientation service trip.

Lula Tye Shelter, 1980
Lula Tye Shelter, 1980

Long Trail News, November 1972

Long Trail News, August 1963

Long Trail News, Winter 2010

Long Trail News, Winter 2011