LT Mile 256.7 — Division 12 — Elev. 2260 ft

This log structure was built in 1934 by the LT Patrol and was so named because of the display of shooting stars observed one night during its construction. It has sleeping space for 6. It has been in use from 1934 to present. [GB 24th Edition 1996] This is an open-front shelter, of peeled logs. with stone fireplace and bunks for 6 or 8. Water is found 200 to 400 feet to the east. [GB 10th Edition 1935]

Shooting Star Shelter, 1954

Shooting Star Shelter, 4.4 miles south of the Canadian border, collapsed under heavy snow. The lean-to, built in 1934 by the Long Trail Patrol, was situated on a rock outcrop and named for the shooting stars viewed from the shelter during its construction. GMC hopes to build a shelter at the same site in 2001. [LTN Summer, 2001]

Roy Buchanan and crew hauling logs to construct Shooting Star Shelter
Roy Buchanan and crew hauling logs to construct Shooting Star Shelter

This photograph appeared as an uncaptioned illustration to an article in the Long Trail News of November, 1942. In the following issue Editor Elizabeth Bradstreet Wahl provided the following “explanation:” “Eight Years ago, Roy Buchanan found that in repairing Taft Lodge a 20-foot log about 16 inches through was required, and he was overheard to remark by two Worcester members, “I guess one of you boys had better help me carry it in.” His status as a direct descendant of Paul Bunyan thus established, his admirers in Worcester were nonplussed to see two men pictured in the last issue as helping Roy haul a log up to Shooting Star Shelter. John Vondell expressed the concern felt by the section at this admission of weakness, and received this explanation from Roy: “As to the picture of three men and one log, I am surprised that you misunderstood it. If you will look closely, you will see that I am pulling the log as you thought I would be. The fellow ahead is keeping the slack rope out of my way, and the fellow behind is ready to stop the log when it’s far enough along. We have to do it that way when the slope is not very steep because when a log goes it is apt to move with great velocity thus overshooting its mark. I trust that you will now understand.'”

Shooting Star Shelter, by Roy Buchanan