Taylor Lodge,1926
Taylor Lodge,1926

First known as Nebraska Notch Lodge.

By the summer of 1925 need was felt for a lodge in the vicinity of Nebraska Notch. The Club had been using the Trout Club facilities. The Trout Club was willing to donate the land but stipulated that an open shelter be built. The Section wanted a closed lodge, so the project was put on hold due to lack of funds and the Trout Club’s stipulation. Then the Main Club came through with the offer of $1000 from the Judge Hazelton Fund for the building of a lodge. It was voted to start building the lodge in Nebraska Notch and the cost of the structure was not to exceed $750. Just how the objections of the Trout Club were overcome is not clear from the records, but the lodge referred to as Nebraska Notch Lodge and later named Taylor Lodge was· built for $150. less than authorized. [Burlington Section Records 1910-1927]

This lodge, named for the founder of the GMC, was built by the Burlington Section in 1926 under the skillful direction of Ernest E. Smith and Dr. E. G. Twitchell. It is built of peeled logs and located about 1/4 mile east of the summit of Nebraska Notch. It is a closed cabin with stove, simple cooking utensils and bunks for 16. Its elevation is about 1900 feet and just back of it is a good lookout to the east over Lake Mansfield. [Supplement to the GB 6th Edition July 1927] This lodge was burned in the winter of 1951. [GB 20th Edition 1971] In Jan. 1951 a group of hikers who had planned to spend the night there discovered that rt had been burned to the ground. The ruins were covered with snow. We assume that the destruction was due to carelessness and not to malice, but no evidence has yet been uncovered as to who the arsonous apes were who set it afire. An ape according to the lexicon of the Burlington Section is an individual who should not be allowed loose in the woods without a keeper. The bright spot to this tragedy is that the Section carried fire insurance for the rebuilding. [LT News, Feb. 1951]