Whiteface Shelter
Whiteface Shelter

Whiteface shelter is a Adirondak style, log lean-to with space for 6 to 10 people. It was built by the Long Trail Patrol in 1958. There is a brook 150 ft east on the Whiteface Trail. It has been in use from 1958 to present. The Sterling Section cared for shelters in this area for many years. [GB 24th Edition 1996] This shelter was built at old location – Adirondack log construction. It sleeps 6 to 10 persons with no stove and cost $556.16 [LT News Feb. 1959]

Brent Teillon and Jeff Limoge meanwhile were doing yeoman duty slogging up through the deep snow (without snowshoes) to make a detailed inspection of Whiteface Shelter for repairs and improvements to be made there. There was slight diversion for them in their unsuccessful effort to de-tree a porcupine so that he might be dispatched to hedgehog heaven (Heaven on earth far a number of them has been the open-faced Whiteface Shelter) With assorted notes, lunch bags whose contents had been appropriately disposed of and a collection of the beer cans and trash that had been left by others, the return trip was made. [Bob Hagerman 5/15/71]

Nov.6 1971, Sterling Sec Members; Brent Teillon, Bob Hagerman, Trip Leaders, John Bissell, Glenn & Marga Sproul, Charles Vile, Frank. Bequaert and son Mike. Troop 76, Morrisville. BSA.

William Myette Scoutmaster, Caroll Brothers. Wade Chaffee. Randy Williams. Ronnie Osborn, Greg Parkhurst, Matthew Myette, Dana Lowe, Bryan Towle, Tommy Williams, Mark Ryder. The day was clear and sunny but cool as we left Morristown Comers Rode in trucks and 4 – wheel drive vehicles to end of newly constructed road towards Beaver Meadow. One vehicle drove further to be handy as emerging vehicle while others hiked in, reaching the “cache” of building materials previously left. These were found in fine shape.

Whiteface Shelter

Boards 12′ long, 6″ wide, and a full-inch thick, were carried up the Whiteface Trail to the shelter, also the sheets of metal roofing were drug up. The wire screening serving as a floor was removed so the accumulated porcupine dung could be removed. A reasonably level floor was laid over the screen. The boards had been creosoted. The new floor greatly improves the shelter. Hagerman, meanwhile built a roaring fire and made gallons of hot chocolate in a large pot. The boy scouts having excess energy continued to the top of Whiteface and returned. The extra boards were used to make a shelf and to patch cracks between the logs. The roof was patched up and screening around base of shelter repaired. A crude shelter for storage of firewood was also built, several trail signs put up , and the fireplace rebuilt. A successful trip due in large measure to the help of the Boy Scouts. All who participated felt a great sense of accomplishment having put Whiteface Shelter in excellent shape. [Brent Teillon and Bob Hagerman, 11/6/1971]

Work Trip June 14, 1975: in generally good condition but sill logs are deteriorating so their replacement will be needed in the not distant future. [Bob Hagerman 6/14/1975]

Work Trip Aug. 6, 1977: Objective of this trip was replacement of the old, galvanized metal root. The roof was a patchwork attar to begin with, assembled from pieces of roofing which probably had been on the shelter which had preceded this one. Continuing complaints had been received in recent years about the roof leaking. … Two steps preceded the work trip itself: (1) GMC’s LT Patrol replaced deteriorated sill logs. (2) Teillon had driven all the supplies by 4-wheel-drive vehicle to within 1/4 mile. He got hung up on a rock and to unload all the materials there, then walk out to get help … two ladders were built. weather-wise, prospects were dim. The old roof removal started at 8:45 a.m. because of rain. Because of the rain, 4 leaks in the roof gave very wet evidence of the need for a new root. The old roof was removed, and new boards nailed in place. An under layer of 15lb felt roofing was laid in place and nailed down. At that point it stated to rain … at that point the under layer made the roof waterproof for at least a time. AH went home. Plans for finishing were indefinite … we thought one or another of the GMC caretakers at shelters on the LT in the Mt Mansfield area would be willing to complete the job. [Bob Hagerman 8/6/1977]

While two Long Trail Patrol crew members pry up a corner of Whiteface Shelter, others press the new log into place.
While two Long Trail Patrol crew members pry up a corner of Whiteface Shelter, others press the new log into place.

During the 1996 spring walk-through, Sterling Section workers cut and peeled a large diameter spruce to replace both sill logs. With the help of GMC Field Assistant Tim Tierney and the Sterling Pond caretaker Michael Moss, Sterling Section stalwarts Bob Lindemann and Smith Edwards hauled up jacks and replaced the north side before the rest of the workers arrived. The rest of the crew helped finish the south side. Bob’s work with the chain saw produced some horizontal cuts on the new piece, which made it easier to get the right fit under the existing logs of the sidewall. After tidying up on the roof and foundation, we wrapped up the shelter work before mid-afternoon. [LT News, Spring 1997]

Inu napping in Whiteface Shelter, 2021
Inu napping in Whiteface Shelter, 2021

Long Trail News, February 1959

Brent Teillon and Bob Hagerman, 11/6/1971

Bob Hagerman, 6/14/1975

Long Trail News, Spring 1997